Brett King

Posts Tagged ‘Ipad’

Lessons from Apple – Great Branches don’t bring customers back

In Branch Strategy, Customer Experience, Retail Banking on March 8, 2012 at 13:22

The new iPad just launched to the usual hype, anticipation and fanfare. Every time a new Apple product comes off the assembly line, it gets put under the biggest magnifying glass imaginable as crowds of onlookers parse the announcement with scholarly intensity, hoping to piece together a picture of what might emerge and what the implications for the world at large will be.

Apple calls their latest release “Resolutionary” in reference to the retina display capabilities of the screen embedded in the new iPad. The New iPad’s “Retina Display” has 1,000,000 More Pixels than a HDTV, and its resolution is so dense that it is beyond the capability of the human eye to recognize individual pixels. We’re reaching the theoretical limit of display resolution – higher resolutions won’t matter if we can’t see the detail.

But that’s not the interesting observance. Apple is the most valued company in the world right now, and it is in that position because it inherently understands consumer behavior in respect to product, brand interaction and purchasing behavior. There’s a lot of banks that would like to think if we turn all our branches into “Apple Stores” that customers will flock back to the branch. But that’s not what the Apple story is telling us.

Will “Apple Store” Branches Save us?

On the eve of 16th December, 2010, Citi opened a glamorous, high-tech branch in New York City’s Union Square. The 9,700 square foot branch was designed by Eight, Inc., the same firm of architects responsible for the unique design of the iconic Apple store. Although Citi actually launched their store concept in Singapore first, the New York store was almost positioned as the saviour of branch banking itself and the “Apple store” moniker was applied repeatedly to indicate it’s revolutionary nature. If you read some of the reports and commentary on Citi’s branch it was clear that many bankers believed that if you just got the branch format right, made the space more attractive for customers, that they’d storm the branch and all would be made right with the world.

But that’s not what happened. While Citi’s “store” was certainly innovative, there’s no evidence that there’s been any net gain in retail activity because of the evolution in branch design. However, some brands like Umpqua, Jyske (Danish) and Che Banca (Italy), playing on the same premise, have claimed some increased branch activity as a result of their evolved spaces. So what is the reality? Are innovative new branch layouts going to change behavior when it comes to banking?

You only need to look at Apple to answer that question.

Store First?

For many Apple newbies their first interaction with Apple products is through an Apple Store or a Apple retailer, but not always. The new iPad that was released yesterday is not yet available in-store, but already there are tens of thousands stacking up to buy the product through their online store. Pre-order activity for the iPad has already had an effect on the online store for Apple.

Checks by Computerworld through 4:15 p.m. ET from multiple locations in the U.S. found the Apple e-store either still sporting a “We’ll be back soon” banner, or if it did load in a browser, becoming unresponsive during the purchase process – Computerworld Article March 7th, 2012


What we know of Apple is that they don’t insist on you coming into a store to make a purchase, or start your relationship with their brand dependent on some process that requires a face-to-face registration for their first product. For the release of the iPad Apple had to actually restrict online customers to buying only two of the devices, due to overwhelming demand through the online store.

The argument often heard by bankers is that regulation forces physical face-to-face compliance processes on us, but even regulations don’t force chartered banks to insist on a face-to-face interaction to onboard or identify a customer. Like Apple, today’s behavior of consumers means we should be ambivalent to the channel a customer chooses.

For the sake of the argument though, let’s assume that the first interaction is in an Apple Store or in-branch. How do customers behave in their interactions with the Apple brand once they have purchased their first iPad, iPhone or Mac computer? Does the most excellent ‘store’ experience drive them back to the store repeatedly over time? No

Great "Stores" don't bring customers back

Let’s look at the revenue story.

Show me the Money!

The average Apple Store makes approximately $34m in revenue annually, with $8.3m in operating income. However, if you examine the 10-K filing for Apple, revenue is split almost 50/50 between online (& device-based store) sales and their retail presence.

Since the Apple “App store” opened on July 10, 2008 Apple has booked close to $6 billion in revenue just on “Apps”. CyberMonday is used as the benchmark for US online and mobile retail sales, and figures show that iPhones and iPads account for a staggering 7-10% of all US online sales activity on those days.

What we know from all the data is this. Customer’s might start their relationship with Apple in-store, but they don’t have to, increasingly they’re choosing not to. Even if they do, 70-75% of the lifetime revenue from the average customer comes from sales online and that is increasing over time.

Customers simple won’t ever go back to the store to buy an App after they’ve bought an iPad or iPhone in-store.

There’s a lot about banking that are like Apps in our financial relationship. Credit limit upgrades, wire transfers, bill payment, CDs/Fixed Deposits, etc. In fact, once we’ve started our relationship with a bank as a customer, pretty much every product we engage with could be purchased just like an App through a better ‘store’ interface online.

Banks don’t sell well online because unlike Apple, we think that the primary store customers want to shop at is our ‘branch’ and when they come to internet banking, we often don’t even integrate sales into that ‘transactional’ platform. But the behavior of Apple customers shows that even with the best benchmark retail presence in the world, customers don’t come back time and time again to your store or even chose the store first. Once they are connected with your brand, they buy your product and utility wherever is most convenient, and that isn’t at the store or branch.

The big question is, how many branches can you afford to support if customers only visit them the first time out and do the rest online?

How Steve Jobs Killed the Branch…

In Customer Experience, Future of Banking on August 25, 2011 at 04:37

As the news of Steve Jobs’ resignation rocks the world today, it’s almost like we’re reading his obituary rather than the news that a Fortune 50 CEO has moved on. The impact of Steve’s resignation will be felt hard on Apple’s share price no doubt, and even potentially hit the very fragile US market at a time of uncertainty. Although Apple’s leader has had a question mark over his health for some time, the eventuality of the departure of such an iconic leader was always going to hurt.

When we look back at the amazing career of Jobs, the creation of Apple, his messianic return to Apple in 1997, the 200 patents filed under his name (although he has no formal engineering qualifications) and the meteoric rise of Apple Stock – from $7 a share in 2003 to around $400 today – we see the evidence of something amazing. But how has Steve Jobs influenced financial services, and how will his legacy continue to influence the sector?

The Graphical User Interface through to Multi-Touch

Although largely attributed to the team at Zerox PARC (Palo Alto Research Center), Apple was the first company to commercialize the Graphical User Interface. The GUI led to the modern computing interface, the creation of the mouse, and the concepts of human computer interaction and usability that are so widespread today. These are at the very core of our understanding of the way individuals interact with devices today.

For almost 10 years (1988-1997), Microsoft and Apple were locked in a legal battle over the apparent IP infringement of “Windows” in respect to the LISA and Apple Macintosh GUIs. Regardless of the eventual outcomes of this battle (which ended in a private settlment between MSFT and APPL in 97) the fact is Jobs’ team (that included much of the PARC team) were credited with the first mass market GUI implementation. Since then the GUI has been a basic element of our computing. The VT-220 green-screens of old have long ago disappeared, thankfully!

However, Apple totally upped the ante in 2007 with the introduction of multi-touch. Combined with Nintendo Wii launch in 2006, multi-touch saw the emergence of a range of direct input innovations. Microsoft followed soon after with Kinect, incorporating gesture based control. Multi-touch was the first incorporation of human control that was direct input, as opposed to a mouse and a keyboard. Even the Wii was an evolution of the input device – multi-touch eliminated an input device all together. This development has forever changed our expectations of device interaction.

Steve Jobs - Branch Killer, Innovator and Visionary (Photo Credit: Apple)

Of course, as banks we’re already massive deploying iPhone, iPad and Android Apps for mobile banking, but we’re also incorporating other direct input methods such as gesture recognition and biometrics into the experience. Recently bank branches have started deploying touch screens, media walls, Microsoft surface tables and even facial recognition in signage displays. Itau bank in Brazil has developed an ATM that uses gestures and 3D to control interactions. But the biggest change was not around input, but a shift in the value of the bank in our day to day life.

Detaching Banking from the Bank

This is not the sole legacy of Steve Jobs and the team at Apple, but when we look back on banking in 10-20 years time when branches have disappeared, we will attribute the destruction of the traditional value chain of banking to the death of the ‘store’. Not all stores are destroyed, of course, but where you have goods or services that can be easily digitized or where distribution does not absolutely require physicality, then the value chain is disrupted. The two big upsets in this evolution of the store were really Amazon’s destruction of the book store, and iTunes destruction of video and music stores.

iTunes was the more significant disruptor for banking, because the “App” has disrupted the retail financial services distribution platform by changing ownership of the customer experience. Today banks who want customers to have access to their banking through a mobile “App”, no longer have direct access to customers. Customers download the ‘bank’ from Apple or from Google, and banks need to meet the criteria of the ‘store’ before customers can get access to that functionality.

In the future the destruction of the physicality of banking from branches, cheques, cards and cash will all be attributed to the emergence of the iPhone. The smartphone with Apps, supported by an App store in the initial instance was the trigger for a whole evolution of interaction on-the-move. Then the mobile wallet and distributed, pervasive, engaged banking through a device that enables payments and connects customers with their bank everyday, will eliminate the need for “the bank”, but not banking products and services.

Gone, but not forgotten

When historians look back at the massive shift in banking and the rapid decline in branch activity, the death of cheques, plastic and cash – the inflection point will be the creation of the App Phone. This is perhaps Steve Jobs’ greatest legacy for banking today.

He has changed the way our customers behave, he’s changed the way we think, and the way we demand service. Thanks to Steve Jobs’ vision – banking of the future will be about banking embedded everyday into our life, a true utility, and no longer a place you go.

In the end when the dust settles, there will still be banks at the backend owning the wires, payments networks and carrying the risk, but they won’t own the customer. The customer will hardly notice banking embedded in their daily life as they go shopping with their phone, as they buy a new car or home, or as they travel overseas or send their kids off to college. It will just be a part of our everyday life, and my kids won’t even remember the days when you used to have to go to a building before you could do this stuff.

When PFM is no longer enough…

In Customer Experience, Internet Banking, Offer Management, Retail Banking on February 8, 2011 at 13:13

At Finovate Europe last week we saw a lot of what I would generally classify as “me too” PFM efforts. While there were a few stand out examples, such as Meniga and Linxo, I don’t think these platforms are robust enough for where we are going. This says a lot I know, because most banks are still not at this basic stage of having PFM deployed and I’m already talking about what comes next, but if you’re a bank about to invest in PFM – then think about whether it goes far enough.

The fact that there is a lot of activity in the PFM space shows that the time is very quickly coming for some sort of customer relationship footprint aggregation/mobilization. But, it’s going to take more than a few fancy pie charts, a drag and drop goal function, and seeing your account usage on a timeline to pimp out my Internet banking.

The information deluge and filtering

One of the challenges I see moving forward is that a pie chart of your portfolio, or a pie chart of spend patterns, or a fancy presentation of your account statement is only going part of the way. Increasingly I need to be able to filter information quickly and understand the context and relevance of that information to me at a glance. While a pie chart is potentially an effective tool to show me some of that, and might even be central in some scenarios, there is a lot of other relevant information that might be prioritized.

Mint Screenshot

There's always a pie chart in there somewhere...

The following information, for example, is not going to be important everyday, but at certain times, it could be quite useful:

  1. You just got paid your salary
  2. Your mortgage account doesn’t have enough money in it for the next payment
  3. Your phone bill is due tomorrow but you haven’t set up a payment
  4. The $25k you have deposited in a savings account should be deployed in a CD or other instrument to be getting better interest
  5. Your wife just maxed out her credit card (ok, I’m told that she’s allowed to do that…)
  6. A retailer you visited 3 times in the last 3 weeks will give you a 15% discount if you use your bank visa card this month
  7. Houses in your neighborhood have just been revalued upwards
  8. Your anniversary is a week away, and here is a special offer for a romantic night away

Then there is statistical information that is useful:

  1. Spending habits that are good/bad
  2. Progress towards a goal
  3. More efficient use of your money
  4. Spending mix
  5. Portfolio rebalancing based on Risk Profile
  6. Available balance on your credit card
  7. Loan refinancing options

This is a lot of information to show on a pie chart or a single screen, so either the bank will cram this information into a ‘dashboard’, or just not show it at all. The capability to filter this information and give direct, relevant feedback to the customer is essentially missing in most banks today.

Seriously, the key to transforming the relationship of the client of today is firstly to demonstrate your value as a bank in the relationship, and second, to anticipate the client’s needs. At the moment, Internet Banking as a platform probably does neither of those well. PFM is a step in the right direction, but it has a way to go, purely because of the volume of information we’ll need processed and the need for relevance.

Digital Relationship as the new metric

Today I received an email from my relationship manager asking me if I would be happy to recommend her. It went something like this (sanitized to protect the bank):

You may have recently received a letter inviting you to ‘Share your Experience’, and I want to take this opportunity to further highlight the features and benefits of this programme. If you know someone, a friend, family member or colleague who would benefit from having a <bank> relationship, I would really appreciate your referral. By introducing someone to <bank>, you open the door for them to the same high level of attention, international services and financial opportunities that you currently enjoy as a <bank> client.
Email Note from my Relationship Manager

I actually have no problem recommending my RM (Relationship Manager) because she has done an excellent job. But there are a few issues I take with the above communication.

Firstly they sent me a letter…seriously?

Secondly, the assumption is that I perceive their service as they do, i.e. “the same high level of attention”, especially given the fact that their digital presence is significantly sub-par.

I’m logging in to Internet banking, and would be logging into mobile banking (if they had it), something like 5-10 times a week. The average customer is doing something similar each month. I visit their ATMs 2-3 times a week, and I visit their branch about twice a year, if I have no other choice.

So their best place to build a relationship with me is online, but they honestly don’t understand that based on their current platform. That relationship will be built through connecting with me through understanding me, and personalizing the dashboard that interfaces me to the bank.

Data visualization is a great start

Infographics are a great benchmark for customer data visualization

Unless you’ve been living under a digital rock these last couple of years, you may have noticed the very interesting trend to represent data and statistical information in a form called Infographics. These graphical representation of data are an excellent method of taking complex graphs, statistics, and information and filtering it for general consumption. Banks, and others, can learn a thing or two about filtering and data visualization from this trend.

Another great approach is that of the iPad app flipboard which aggregates streams of information in an easy to consume format. Could you provide a more interesting way to display account and credit card usage information, perhaps linked back to offers from specific retailers too?

The last step will be all about management. This is the ability to respond to a trigger, an event or a critical piece of information and proactively suggest a response to the customer that builds trust and the service relationship.

Get these right and you’ll have a relationship dashboard that connects you to the customer in a way that no bank does today…

Banks – get your website right first, before you worry about an iPad App!

In Internet Banking, Offer Management, Retail Banking on May 27, 2010 at 12:49

There’s a lot of excitement about Apple’s new iPad. This week it was reported in various news sources that two banks in Australia were releasing an iPad app to capitalize on the iPad fever. Now… you’d normally find one of the first to jump in and hail such an announcement as an indication of real progress in the fight to innovate the retail banking space. But on this occasion, well I’m not jumping…

The two banks in question in this instance are NAB (The bank formerly known as National Australia Bank) and St George (now part of the Westpac group). The problem I have with this whole announcement is not that it isn’t a positive move, because it is, the problem I have is that they still don’t have the fundamentals right on their existing websites and they’re fooling around with the iPad! Get real people!!!

NAB's Dedicated iPad App looks cool! But they've got bigger problems...

If you go to NAB, St George, Wells Fargo, Citibank, Bank of America – well just about any banking website today – the customer experience is pretty poor. When you get behind the login, which is where 70-90% of the traffic goes when it hits the homepage, things get even worse.

For over 10 years most of the banks that I work with have been collecting information about me. They know my spending habits through my credit card usage. They know the mobile phone operators I work with in the countries where I live and work. They know my average spend on things like my Apple iPhone, iPad, Laptop, Flat Screen TV, etc. They know which business accounts I transfer my salary from. They know the relationships I have with various investment partners where I make regular contributions to savings plans or lump sum payments to my managed funds. They know which stocks I favor and hold in my portfolio. The also know the name of children, how long I’ve been married and the last three residences I’ve had. The reason I know they know all this is that either it is something they’ve asked me as part of their KYC (Know Your Customer) procedures, or something that appears on the statements they send me for my credit card or various accounts. They have the potential to know me and my financial savings and consumption habits, probably better than I know myself. But…you wouldn’t know it.

The thing is…when I visit their website or login to internet banking – they appear to have absolutely no idea of who I am.

In the late 90s I remember that there was a huge push for ‘personalization’ and CMS’. But what have we really learned about forming the appropriate message and content on our homepages in that time? Pretty much nothing. Let’s look at an organization that has learned about the value of the homepage:

“Yahoo is a company that is very strong in content. It’s moving towards the web of one. We have 32,000 variations on our front page module. We serve a million of those a day. It’s all customized. Our click-through rate went up twice since we started customizing this.”
Carol Bartz, CEO of Yahoo, TechCrunch Disrupt, May 24, 2010

So why is it that banks have no idea how to engage me? Here’s a simple test. Take two products that are fairly popular when you review search engine keywords related to banks – mortgages and student loans. When I go to any of the sites mentioned above, finding information on these two products is generally not that difficult. However, when I’m doing research on these products, studies show that I will probably come back a few times to my bank’s website before I decide to apply (if I can apply online at all that is). It is the easiest thing in the world when I return to the bank’s homepage for me to be presented with an offer for a mortgage or a student loan up front, based on what I looked at on my last visit. By prioritizing this content up front, simply through the use of cookies, I dramatically improve the likelihood I’ll get where I need to. The bank already knows I’m interested in this product, so why bother slamming me with the offer of the month or telling me about the bank’s social corporate responsibility program. Give me something relevant!

The fact is, pretty much every bank you visit online these days forgets you as soon as you close the tab or window on the browser. That’s why, with many bank websites, were still presented with commercial banking information, investor news and even the dreaded press releases when 99% of the traffic is focused on retail banking related services and products.

With the amount of data bank’s have on their customers and the amount of data they have on traffic, product enquiries, applications and transaction history – building a platform to allow customization of the homepage should be a snap. There is no offer management, no active sales engagement either through the homepage or the secure internet banking portal – it’s just like walking into my branch and feeling like nobody knows me.

A word to the wise – you should know me well enough to serve me better through these basic platforms. Get those right before you start worrying about your iPad app!

Brett King: Radio 938Live – Singapore Interview

In Media, Mobile Banking, Retail Banking, Social Networking, Strategy, Technology Innovation on April 30, 2010 at 08:32

Michelle Martin
Radio 93.8 Singapore938 website
Segment: – Passion People

Radio segment that aired on Radio 93.8 Singapore 30th of April, 2010 (Recorded Friday 23rd of April). Michelle Martin and Radio 938 were so kind as to give me a very decent opportunity to explain more about the premise behind BANK 2.0 as a book and talk about the real challenges facing banks in creating or adopting innovations around customer experience.

The interview is approximately 10 minutes in length (uploaded in 2 parts due to file size). Hope you find the insights useful.

Radio 938 Interview – Part 1
Listen to Radio938Bank2.0-Part1

Radio 938 Interview – Part 2
Listen to Radio938Bank2.0-Part2