Brett King

Posts Tagged ‘internet’

Could SOPA kill a bank website?

In Internet Banking, Media, Strategy on January 17, 2012 at 21:50

The PROTECT IP Act (Preventing Real Online Threats to Economic Creativity and Theft of Intellectual Property Act of 2011), is a proposed law with the stated goal of giving the US government and copyright holders additional tools to curb access to “rogue websites dedicated to infringing or counterfeit goods”, especially those registered outside the U.S. Both of these “Acts” would have massive impact globally, and could create absolute chaos. The PROTECT IP Act is a re-write of the Combating Online Infringement and Counterfeits Act which failed to pass in 2010.

SOPA builds on PIPA. Known as the Stop Online Piracy Act or SOPA, is a bill that was introduced in the United States House of Representatives on October 26, 2011, by House Judiciary Committee Chair Representative Lamar S. Smith and a bipartisan group of 12 co-sponsors. The bill, if made law, would expand the ability of U.S. law enforcement and copyright holders to fight online trafficking in copyrighted intellectual property and counterfeit goods.

As proposed, SOPA would allow the U.S. Government the power to block any website from both a DNS Lookup, and eliminate it from search engine results – without needing any court order. Due to the vague nature of the bill being passed through, this could create significant chaos. So what about for banks? Would SOPA/PIPA impact banks at all? Is it in the interest of banks to support or push back against these bills?

Enforcement process

The key problem with SOPA is around enforcement actions available to copyright holders and the US Department of Justice (DoJ). The enforcement actions are unilateral, brutal and extreme. Violators face immediate action against their site and/or business, and up to 5 years in jail for infringement. The fact that you might be in another country and not subject to US law, doesn’t really factor in this process.

If a violation is lodged by a copyright holder, or as SOPA defines it “the owner or operator of such Internet site is facilitating the commission of [copyright infringement]”, the site in question can be blocked at the DNS (Domain Name Server) level and removed from all websites. Payment providers (section (b)(1)) and ad networks ((b)(2)) are required, upon receiving a claim against a site by a copyright holder (section (4)(A)(i)), to cut off all services to the accused site within five days, unless they receive a counter-notification from the operator of the accused site. Note that there is no requirement that the accused be actually notified of the accusation, and thus, they would have no opportunity to provide a counter-notice. Probably the first you’d know about it is when your email stops working, or customers start calling letting you know your site is down.

The only way to provide a counter-notice to a claim or breach is to agree to submit to U.S. jurisdiction (section (5)(A)(ii)) if you are a foreigner, and to state under penalty of perjury that your product does not fit the definition of an “Internet site…dedicated to theft of U.S. property.”

The definition of SOPA around offensive ‘copyright violation’ behavior is as follows:

An `Internet site is dedicated to theft of U.S. property’ if [a portion of the site is US-directed] and is used by users within the United States and is primarily designed or operated for the purpose of offering services in a manner that enables or facilitates [copyright violation or circumvention of copyright protection measures].

This means that YouTube, Facebook, Wikipedia, Gmail, Dropbox and millions of other sites would be “Internet sites…dedicated to theft of U.S. property,” under SOPA’s definition. As far as being ‘US-directed’, any contact form that enables a US consumer to enter their details, would be in violation from this perspective.

There’s an excellent review of much of these specifics around the law and how it ties in with enforcement action on Mashable.

Scenarios to think about?

So what does this mean? To illustrate simply, lets say you post a video of your baby dancing to Beyonce’s new song, filming your kids song and dance routine of their favorite bands song, you post a review of a restaurant or show a photo of a new gadget you’ve purchased. The site you hosted it on would be banned from search engines, advertising companies would not be able to do business with that company and internet providers will be forced to block their customers from accessing those sites and you the uploader would be fined and sentenced to jail for 5 years on a 1st offense.

What about in respect to banks, banking content and possible SOPA violations?

Here’s a few banking specific scenarios that I identified from SOPA that could be problematic for banks:

  • A bank promotes an iPad or iPhone giveaway as part of an offer – unless you had Apple’s permission, you’d be in violation
  • The use of an image of a car or car brand in a motor vehicle insurance advertisement
  • Credit Card Loyalty programs that promote rewards using products would be in direct violation of SOPA
  • A contact form that allows a US citizen to apply for a pre-paid Visa Debit Card on a foreign website before they travel overseas on a trip.

Let me illustrate how ridiculous this is.

HSBC in Hong Kong offers a program of rewards for cardholders they call “RewardCash“. Their RewardCash e-Shop shows products like a Mophie Juice Pack, a Panasonic Rechargeable Shaver, Targus USB powered Travel Speakers, Victorinox 22″ Carry-on luggage, etc. Let’s say that one of those companies was trawling the web and found ‘image’ violations of their product, it could be interpreted that HSBC was using credit card ‘rewards’, miles or points as an alternative currency to sell those products and circumvent US distribution chains, and a complaint could be lodged with the Department of Justice. A similar complaint could be lodged if a brand owner feared fake products were being given away from this site. They wouldn’t need proof, just the ‘threat’ of potential impact to a US IP owner.

5 days later, HSBC.com (and other domains) would be removed from the DNS databases in the US and around the world, becoming totally inaccesible. While HSBC would have the right of recourse, the damage would be massive and very, very expensive. Internet banking would be down. The main website would be down. Staff email would be down.

Now, could this scenario really happen? It’s unlikely, but the point is that SOPA would allow such an action to be taken.

Imagine how much fun legal and compliance would have with this legislation?

A disaster

All in all, SOPA simply is a disaster for the future of business, free commerce and innovation. The Whitehouse Administration cautioned in a blog post last week that it would not support any bill that did not “guard against the risk of online censorship of lawful activity and must not inhibit innovation by our dynamic businesses large and small.” While this is not a direct condemnation of the proposed act, it seems probably that President Obama would veto this bill if it was passed into law – and he’d be right to do so.

The MPAA and RIAA lobby groups that have driven this law to Capitol Hill, should not be in a position where foreign banks could be brought to their knees by nonsensical legislation. This is very one-sided legislation.

Private Banking 2.0

In Bank Innovation, Customer Experience, Future of Banking, Social Networking, Strategy on April 6, 2011 at 02:24

Since the emergence of online banking there has been a fundamental assertion from high-net-worth bankers that their clients aren’t digitally focused, they don’t use social media or mobile banking, and that they prefer to pick up the phone and engage their banker because the nature of their interactions is defined by their wealth – they want the highest-level of service that only comes from engagement through a personal banker.

Is this business immune to disruption, despite the rest of the retail bank being in an extremely disruptive state? It’s apparent that Private Banks are now seeing customers move more frequently to multi-bank relationships because the basic digital hygiene factors within the Private Bank are not taken care of. For a Private Bank to claim that they are the best of the best, but to be amongst the worst digitally is contradictory.  So the depth of the relationship and scale of AuM (Assets under Management) are suffering because of lack of web, mobile and social capability, and Private Bankers are seeing a fragmentation of service offerings as a result of service perceptions.

If we look at High-Net-Worth-Individuals (HNWI), the facts are that they are extremely service conscious and generally loath inefficiencies. Entrepreneurs and successful business people in the HNWI category were the first to get Blackberry’s, the first to get wireless broadband modems so they could work on their laptop in the limo from the airport to the office or sitting in the Maybach running around town, amongst the first to get the cool new iPad or the latest gadget. So right now, clients of private banks are asking – why can I login and do this day-to-day stuff through HSBC, Barclays or BofA, but I can’t through my Private Bank?

So where does technology fit, and can it provide real value? Is there a way that technology can deepen relationships with clients, or does it mean that relationships are less sticky because they are doing more interactions with the brand electronically?

The digital relationship

Recently a well known ex F1 driver and commentator was spotted on Twitter asking his Private Bank, Coutts of London, whether they had a local branch in Miami. The Coutts team respond within just a few minutes of seeing that enquiry come past the Twitter account and letting the F1 driver know that his Banker would be on the phone to him in a jiffy. Such a response is not the norm.

When presented with this sort of scenario, many Private Bankers scratch their heads and ask why a distinguished client like an ex-F1 champion would use Twitter to talk to his Private Banker instead of a simple phone call? That’s not the point – you can choose to approach every single client and ask them why on earth they would want to use Twitter, or you can simply understand that an emerging channel like Twitter needs support.

As the next generation of Private Banking clients start to take over from their parents, the last thing you want is to be identified as that stodgy, old, out-of-date bank that my father used.

Stereotypes that Private Banking clients don't do Digital are just wrong...

Maximizing the client interaction

Perhaps the biggest revolution is in the primary face-to-face asset allocation meeting with the client. Over time we have gradually increased complexity as a result of KYC and risk, for what used to be a simple chat between a client and his banker. Now we load up our client with forms, risk profile questionnaires, with brochures, technical data, etc. that doesn’t actually enhance the relationship – it just complicates it.

Soon we’ll be asking the client to do the risk profiling stuff at home online and we’ll verify this with the client face-to-face. We won’t ask the client to fill out the same compliance information on a paper form that we’ve already asked for 20 times before, because we’ll execute electronically using the data we already have stored.

When we sit with them in a planning session, we’ll use tablet based tools that allows us to show our clients what-if scenarios and adjusted asset allocations that work better for them, then we’ll give them a selection of product decisions which they can learn more about at home online or execute electronically from behind the login. Why?

The real revolution here is in simplicity of the interaction. By maximizing time with our client for discussing their needs, and shifting other activities to supporting channels, we improve service levels. Even the humble monthly statement will be digitized with interactive components explaining market movements, the client’s net position and short-term investment opportunities.

Social Scoring

In respect to client acquisition, the world of transparency through social media will increasingly start to impact banks in the coming 2-3 years. Brands and private bankers will be anonymously scored online as to their effectiveness. Just like dating services, social networks will be able to match bank’s relationship managers with clients based on their expertise, location, and their ranking amongst peers.

When we search for Private Banks on Google or YouTube, what results will we see? We won’t any longer see the most popular brands, but the most respected brands amongst our peer group based on your social score. Unless you have a strong connection digitally with your clients, your social score is going to hurt you on the acquisition side of the business. After all, Private Banking is first and foremost about trust in your advisor – if my friends don’t trust and recommend you, how can I trust you?

Conclusion

Once thought immune to the changes in multi-channel engagement, it turns out that perhaps the most important clients in the retail banking marketplace need to be highly connected, to provide the required service levels. For most private banks, this is an epiphany and hence, we’re seeing aggressive investment in this space today.

If you want to be the trusted advisor – it is clear you need to be connected and recommended. Engagement is no longer limited to a phone or face-to-face, the private banker must extend his reach to clients at every opportunity. A deeper relationship, depends on context and connection – not just a brand and asset management capability.

When PFM is no longer enough…

In Customer Experience, Internet Banking, Offer Management, Retail Banking on February 8, 2011 at 13:13

At Finovate Europe last week we saw a lot of what I would generally classify as “me too” PFM efforts. While there were a few stand out examples, such as Meniga and Linxo, I don’t think these platforms are robust enough for where we are going. This says a lot I know, because most banks are still not at this basic stage of having PFM deployed and I’m already talking about what comes next, but if you’re a bank about to invest in PFM – then think about whether it goes far enough.

The fact that there is a lot of activity in the PFM space shows that the time is very quickly coming for some sort of customer relationship footprint aggregation/mobilization. But, it’s going to take more than a few fancy pie charts, a drag and drop goal function, and seeing your account usage on a timeline to pimp out my Internet banking.

The information deluge and filtering

One of the challenges I see moving forward is that a pie chart of your portfolio, or a pie chart of spend patterns, or a fancy presentation of your account statement is only going part of the way. Increasingly I need to be able to filter information quickly and understand the context and relevance of that information to me at a glance. While a pie chart is potentially an effective tool to show me some of that, and might even be central in some scenarios, there is a lot of other relevant information that might be prioritized.

Mint Screenshot

There's always a pie chart in there somewhere...

The following information, for example, is not going to be important everyday, but at certain times, it could be quite useful:

  1. You just got paid your salary
  2. Your mortgage account doesn’t have enough money in it for the next payment
  3. Your phone bill is due tomorrow but you haven’t set up a payment
  4. The $25k you have deposited in a savings account should be deployed in a CD or other instrument to be getting better interest
  5. Your wife just maxed out her credit card (ok, I’m told that she’s allowed to do that…)
  6. A retailer you visited 3 times in the last 3 weeks will give you a 15% discount if you use your bank visa card this month
  7. Houses in your neighborhood have just been revalued upwards
  8. Your anniversary is a week away, and here is a special offer for a romantic night away

Then there is statistical information that is useful:

  1. Spending habits that are good/bad
  2. Progress towards a goal
  3. More efficient use of your money
  4. Spending mix
  5. Portfolio rebalancing based on Risk Profile
  6. Available balance on your credit card
  7. Loan refinancing options

This is a lot of information to show on a pie chart or a single screen, so either the bank will cram this information into a ‘dashboard’, or just not show it at all. The capability to filter this information and give direct, relevant feedback to the customer is essentially missing in most banks today.

Seriously, the key to transforming the relationship of the client of today is firstly to demonstrate your value as a bank in the relationship, and second, to anticipate the client’s needs. At the moment, Internet Banking as a platform probably does neither of those well. PFM is a step in the right direction, but it has a way to go, purely because of the volume of information we’ll need processed and the need for relevance.

Digital Relationship as the new metric

Today I received an email from my relationship manager asking me if I would be happy to recommend her. It went something like this (sanitized to protect the bank):

You may have recently received a letter inviting you to ‘Share your Experience’, and I want to take this opportunity to further highlight the features and benefits of this programme. If you know someone, a friend, family member or colleague who would benefit from having a <bank> relationship, I would really appreciate your referral. By introducing someone to <bank>, you open the door for them to the same high level of attention, international services and financial opportunities that you currently enjoy as a <bank> client.
Email Note from my Relationship Manager

I actually have no problem recommending my RM (Relationship Manager) because she has done an excellent job. But there are a few issues I take with the above communication.

Firstly they sent me a letter…seriously?

Secondly, the assumption is that I perceive their service as they do, i.e. “the same high level of attention”, especially given the fact that their digital presence is significantly sub-par.

I’m logging in to Internet banking, and would be logging into mobile banking (if they had it), something like 5-10 times a week. The average customer is doing something similar each month. I visit their ATMs 2-3 times a week, and I visit their branch about twice a year, if I have no other choice.

So their best place to build a relationship with me is online, but they honestly don’t understand that based on their current platform. That relationship will be built through connecting with me through understanding me, and personalizing the dashboard that interfaces me to the bank.

Data visualization is a great start

Infographics are a great benchmark for customer data visualization

Unless you’ve been living under a digital rock these last couple of years, you may have noticed the very interesting trend to represent data and statistical information in a form called Infographics. These graphical representation of data are an excellent method of taking complex graphs, statistics, and information and filtering it for general consumption. Banks, and others, can learn a thing or two about filtering and data visualization from this trend.

Another great approach is that of the iPad app flipboard which aggregates streams of information in an easy to consume format. Could you provide a more interesting way to display account and credit card usage information, perhaps linked back to offers from specific retailers too?

The last step will be all about management. This is the ability to respond to a trigger, an event or a critical piece of information and proactively suggest a response to the customer that builds trust and the service relationship.

Get these right and you’ll have a relationship dashboard that connects you to the customer in a way that no bank does today…

The biggest disruptions in banking in 2011…

In Customer Experience, Retail Banking, Social Networking on December 29, 2010 at 03:00

In 2010 we had a bunch of innovative ideas become mainstream and start to impact the banking arena (for a full coverage see my post in Huffington.) However, 2011 promises to be more disruptive because as the economy finally starts to warm up, we’ll be seeing a lot of new private equity investment into start-ups in the finance arena.

A new dot com boom?

The intersection of interaction design, mobile technology, mobile payments, social media interactions, geo-location technology and augmented reality is producing a land grab for innovative new start-ups. We’ve already seen quite a few investments in new banking start-ups in 2010, which are the early stages of a new boom in the mobile tech space. Right now we’re not yet in the bubble, obviously, but as start-ups grow revenue, as investments start seeing huge multiples, and as the success of start-ups generate even more new business ideas, then this zone appears ripe for an emerging boom. Add into the mix the dissatisfaction en masse with the finance sector, one area where there is sure to be heady action is in the alternative banking and finance game.

Already we’ve seen start-up investments in peer-to-peer lending (Zopa, Lending Club, Prosper, Kiva, etc), payments alternatives (i.e. Jack Dorsey’s Square), Personal Finance tools (Geezeo, Mint, GreenSherpa, Blippy, etc), and even in Banking itself (BankSimple, MovenBank).

In September of 2010, Think Finance secured $90 million in start-up funding for their Elastic web-based bank account replacement. Elastic’s services to the underbanked will somewhat overlap with BankSimple’s approach to online banking. But, the CEO of Think Finance, Ken Rees, doesn’t see BankSimple as competition.

“We celebrate all of the innovators in the space that use technology for banking purposes. They [BankSimple] are more focused on the needs of prime consumers. We’re focused on the underbanked and unbanked — the estimated 60 million people who are not well served by traditional banks,” says Rees.
As reported in Mashable

Jack Dorsey at Square is catering for a gap in bank service performance demographics also. Dorsey is aiming Square at the approximately 30 million small business owners in the US that don’t have a merchant account or credit card terminal. With only 6 million businesses in the US that can currently accept credit card payments, this shows there is huge growth potential for thinking outside of the box in respect to banking and payments models.

The growing innovation and infrastructure gap

The problem for the finance sector with the current level of investment in infrastructure, and old stagnant business models built largely around physical distribution paradigms, is that increasingly we’ll be dealing with start-ups and innovators from outside the traditional banking arena. This will increase the gap between customer experience or in real terms, customer behavior, and the actual state of play in the industry.

While the sector as a whole tries to deal with the devastation of the global financial crisis, and uses this as an excuse to hunker down and resist strong investment in technology and so forth, this opens the gate for innovators who are prepared to invest to take customer mind share, and capitalize on both the wholesale dissatisfaction of the industry in general and capturing the imagination of customers through the use of technology and better interface processes.

The 3 Phases of Disruption - Impact to Finance Sector

For those of you who have read BANK 2.0, you may recall the “3 Phases of Behavioral Disruption” which identify the emergence of Internet, the take up of mobile smart phones and “app” phones, and finally the integration of payments technology and services into the handset. There are two broad opportunities within these 3 phases of disruption for adverse impact to the traditional financial services space.

The Infrastructure Gap

The first opportunity lies in the inability of banks and financial institutions to invest in customer facing technology ahead of the curve, which creates a considerable lag in capability. Banks keep looking for ROI, but at the rate that new technologies are being adopted these days, if you wait for ROI you’re already 2-3 years behind the competition. Banks have to make bets on a number of emerging technologies, experiment and adapt through iteration, rather than wait till a dominant player or platform emerges (which is unlikely in any case) before making strong investments.

In this gap we have players like PayPal, cloud services, direct banks (e.g. ING Direct, UBank, Jibun) and other platform opportunities who are doing it better on a technology platform basis than the traditionals. The opportunity here is for start-ups to leap ahead of banks who are straddled with outmoded legacy systems which simply are not robust enough to work in an always on, superconnected space that customers live in today.

The Behavior Gap

The behavior gap, however, is where the really interesting stuff is happening on a business model front. The gap in behavior is defined in anticipating the ways customers work with new technology and reinventing both the user interface, the interactions and the processes and rules that support the engagement or journey. Banks are enamored with their existing, stagnant model of banking – they find it difficult to imagine a world where mobile applications and internet banking are more popular access methods than branches, where checks no longer cut it because I can SMS or bump money to an associate, and where I am not penalized because I don’t want to follow some archaic risk model. Companies like Square, BankSimple, even Apple and Google who are reinventing the interface to the customer are capturing the hearts and minds of customers everyday, while banks continue to frustrate customers with old models, outdated rules of engagement, and with broken processes and channel support mechanisms.

Conclusion

The biggest risk to the finance sector today is not from other banks, nor related to the inability to apply Basel III risk controls or standards. The biggest risk to the finance sector today is the growing gap between the institution and the customer. The rate at which this gap is opening up is increasing rapidly, as the adoption of newer technology increases too. This is where we are going to see an explosion of start-ups and new businesses who aren’t afraid to reinvent the bank customer experience. This is where the banks who do get customer and try to reinvent the journeys customers are taking will win.

It’s also where banks who wait for ROI, or wait to understand the impact of social media, mobile, near-field contactless payments and other such technologies before investing, will lose out massively.

What Wikileaks means for the finance sector…

In Groundswell, Media on December 7, 2010 at 08:24

The major news feeds of the world are buzzing with the arrest of Wikileaks founder Julian Assange in London today. Assange was arrested based on an extradition request from the Swedish government, issued last week. Swedish authorities had issued the warrant for Assange so they can talk to him about sex-crime allegations supposedly unrelated to WikiLeaks’ recent disclosure of secret U.S. documents. From blog commentary doing the rounds online, however, it appears that nobody is really buying the ‘unrelated’ nature of the dogged pursuit of Assange. Can you recall the last time you heard of an extradition request issued in this manner by the Swedish government?

Clearly Wikileaks appears to be a significant threat to governments, large institutions, and generally to the so-called industrial-military complex as far as their ability to contain or curtail information about their ‘secret’ activities. Tom Flanagan, an advisor to the Canadian PM, even went so far as to suggest Assange should be assassinated, sparking rapid retractions from the UK and Canadian governments

.

Julian Assange - Hero of the People or Villan?

Digital and organizational attacks against Wikileaks

Wikileaks has been the subject of concerted digital attacks in the last couple of weeks. These attacks, originating primarily in the United States and other friendly nations are strongly suspected of being, at least passively, supported by the US Government. Originally Wikileaks moved their servers to Amazon’s cloud platform in the US to be able to cope with the DDoS attacks coming their way. However, in a move many suspect of being due to pressure from the US government Amazon removed Wikileaks from their platform last week citing breaches of their Service Level Agreement.

Just a few hours after Amazon’s announcement the company who registered the Wikileaks.org domain Everydns announced the removal of Wikileaks.org from the DNS (Domain Name Server) database. The DNS database interprets the URL you type into a browser to find the specific computer hosting the website you are looking for, so by removing the domain from the DNS database, it meant people typing in wikileaks.org would no longer find the site.

While this was all happening, Julian Assange, the enigmatic founder of Wikileaks was doggedly being pursued. His own personal bank account hosted by Post Finance in Switzerland, a notoriously difficult country to have their feathers ruffled over such international issues, was frozen. In response, hackers supporting the Wikileaks organization launched a DDoS attack of their own against Post Finance, taking their site down (as of 11:30 GMT Tuesday it remains offline).

To combat the large scale attacks against their domain and site, Wikileaks then appealed to the web community at large to assist by mirroring or hosting a copy of the site on their own DNS platforms. To date more than 500 separate servers have responded positively to this request, making the takedown of Wikileaks in totality impossible.

Historical Parallels

During the Middle-Ages the possession of the old and new testament was banned by the Church. This information was considered sacred and only to be handled by the intellectual elite, namely the clergy class. Those who went against this were persecuted, or even burned at the stake for heresy, such as the Lollards, Sir John Oldcastle, Thomas Harding and many others.

The thing that broke the back of the stranglehold the church held on scripture was technology, specifically the invention of the printing press, which allowed rapid production and distribution of scripture in printed form. Johannes Gutenberg, who invented the printing press and moveable type, is largely credited with this revolution, which eventually lead to the start of the reformation in Europe. Prior to Gutenberg’s press, copies of the bible had to be copied out by hand, dramatically reducing the ability to distribute the text, thus the church was largely able to limit access during this period of history.

Breaking distribution strongholds and information scarcity

Wikileaks and the internet in general, has produced the same profound effect on the distribution of information. The music industry, publishers, media and the finance sector are finding that they can’t protect their businesses from rapid innovation, disintermediation and the destruction of long-held traditional business models because of this change in modality. Governments, and large corporations (like Enron for example) are now finding they can’t limit ‘damage’ by restricting the availability of information or data in respect to their internal operations, especially when such activities are illegal, unethical or morally bankrupt.

Julian Assange, and Bradley Manning (who allegedly provided Wikileaks with much of the information about the US government), will probably be looked back on in the future much in the way Gutenberg was, as groundbreaking revolutionaries who pushed the ‘system’ to evolve for the betterment of all. Right now, it doesn’t look like that, but with the momentum, transparency and global nature of the web as a medium, to think that this cat can be put back in the box is simply irrational or wishful thinking.

The finance sector, governments and large corporations have to get used to a permanent shift in transparency and expectation of customers and constituents in respect to information flow and availability. To think you can spin, lie or manage the public with false information is to invite the sort of disaster in respect to reputation that the US government faces today.