Brett King

Posts Tagged ‘BANK 2.0’

VIDEO: Opportunities to serve the underbanked

In Customer Experience, Economics, Mobile Banking on March 3, 2011 at 09:00

With somewhere between 40-70m underbanked in the United States alone, there are significant opportunities to re-think where these individuals fit in the banking landscape.

Since the introduction of the Durbin amendment the likelihood of more of this segment entering the mainstream banking sphere is further reduced. How will mobile payments and pre-paid debit cards effect this growing segment?

Video Briefing – Opportunities in the Underbanked Space

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When PFM is no longer enough…

In Customer Experience, Internet Banking, Offer Management, Retail Banking on February 8, 2011 at 13:13

At Finovate Europe last week we saw a lot of what I would generally classify as “me too” PFM efforts. While there were a few stand out examples, such as Meniga and Linxo, I don’t think these platforms are robust enough for where we are going. This says a lot I know, because most banks are still not at this basic stage of having PFM deployed and I’m already talking about what comes next, but if you’re a bank about to invest in PFM – then think about whether it goes far enough.

The fact that there is a lot of activity in the PFM space shows that the time is very quickly coming for some sort of customer relationship footprint aggregation/mobilization. But, it’s going to take more than a few fancy pie charts, a drag and drop goal function, and seeing your account usage on a timeline to pimp out my Internet banking.

The information deluge and filtering

One of the challenges I see moving forward is that a pie chart of your portfolio, or a pie chart of spend patterns, or a fancy presentation of your account statement is only going part of the way. Increasingly I need to be able to filter information quickly and understand the context and relevance of that information to me at a glance. While a pie chart is potentially an effective tool to show me some of that, and might even be central in some scenarios, there is a lot of other relevant information that might be prioritized.

Mint Screenshot

There's always a pie chart in there somewhere...

The following information, for example, is not going to be important everyday, but at certain times, it could be quite useful:

  1. You just got paid your salary
  2. Your mortgage account doesn’t have enough money in it for the next payment
  3. Your phone bill is due tomorrow but you haven’t set up a payment
  4. The $25k you have deposited in a savings account should be deployed in a CD or other instrument to be getting better interest
  5. Your wife just maxed out her credit card (ok, I’m told that she’s allowed to do that…)
  6. A retailer you visited 3 times in the last 3 weeks will give you a 15% discount if you use your bank visa card this month
  7. Houses in your neighborhood have just been revalued upwards
  8. Your anniversary is a week away, and here is a special offer for a romantic night away

Then there is statistical information that is useful:

  1. Spending habits that are good/bad
  2. Progress towards a goal
  3. More efficient use of your money
  4. Spending mix
  5. Portfolio rebalancing based on Risk Profile
  6. Available balance on your credit card
  7. Loan refinancing options

This is a lot of information to show on a pie chart or a single screen, so either the bank will cram this information into a ‘dashboard’, or just not show it at all. The capability to filter this information and give direct, relevant feedback to the customer is essentially missing in most banks today.

Seriously, the key to transforming the relationship of the client of today is firstly to demonstrate your value as a bank in the relationship, and second, to anticipate the client’s needs. At the moment, Internet Banking as a platform probably does neither of those well. PFM is a step in the right direction, but it has a way to go, purely because of the volume of information we’ll need processed and the need for relevance.

Digital Relationship as the new metric

Today I received an email from my relationship manager asking me if I would be happy to recommend her. It went something like this (sanitized to protect the bank):

You may have recently received a letter inviting you to ‘Share your Experience’, and I want to take this opportunity to further highlight the features and benefits of this programme. If you know someone, a friend, family member or colleague who would benefit from having a <bank> relationship, I would really appreciate your referral. By introducing someone to <bank>, you open the door for them to the same high level of attention, international services and financial opportunities that you currently enjoy as a <bank> client.
Email Note from my Relationship Manager

I actually have no problem recommending my RM (Relationship Manager) because she has done an excellent job. But there are a few issues I take with the above communication.

Firstly they sent me a letter…seriously?

Secondly, the assumption is that I perceive their service as they do, i.e. “the same high level of attention”, especially given the fact that their digital presence is significantly sub-par.

I’m logging in to Internet banking, and would be logging into mobile banking (if they had it), something like 5-10 times a week. The average customer is doing something similar each month. I visit their ATMs 2-3 times a week, and I visit their branch about twice a year, if I have no other choice.

So their best place to build a relationship with me is online, but they honestly don’t understand that based on their current platform. That relationship will be built through connecting with me through understanding me, and personalizing the dashboard that interfaces me to the bank.

Data visualization is a great start

Infographics are a great benchmark for customer data visualization

Unless you’ve been living under a digital rock these last couple of years, you may have noticed the very interesting trend to represent data and statistical information in a form called Infographics. These graphical representation of data are an excellent method of taking complex graphs, statistics, and information and filtering it for general consumption. Banks, and others, can learn a thing or two about filtering and data visualization from this trend.

Another great approach is that of the iPad app flipboard which aggregates streams of information in an easy to consume format. Could you provide a more interesting way to display account and credit card usage information, perhaps linked back to offers from specific retailers too?

The last step will be all about management. This is the ability to respond to a trigger, an event or a critical piece of information and proactively suggest a response to the customer that builds trust and the service relationship.

Get these right and you’ll have a relationship dashboard that connects you to the customer in a way that no bank does today…

The biggest disruptions in banking in 2011…

In Customer Experience, Retail Banking, Social Networking on December 29, 2010 at 03:00

In 2010 we had a bunch of innovative ideas become mainstream and start to impact the banking arena (for a full coverage see my post in Huffington.) However, 2011 promises to be more disruptive because as the economy finally starts to warm up, we’ll be seeing a lot of new private equity investment into start-ups in the finance arena.

A new dot com boom?

The intersection of interaction design, mobile technology, mobile payments, social media interactions, geo-location technology and augmented reality is producing a land grab for innovative new start-ups. We’ve already seen quite a few investments in new banking start-ups in 2010, which are the early stages of a new boom in the mobile tech space. Right now we’re not yet in the bubble, obviously, but as start-ups grow revenue, as investments start seeing huge multiples, and as the success of start-ups generate even more new business ideas, then this zone appears ripe for an emerging boom. Add into the mix the dissatisfaction en masse with the finance sector, one area where there is sure to be heady action is in the alternative banking and finance game.

Already we’ve seen start-up investments in peer-to-peer lending (Zopa, Lending Club, Prosper, Kiva, etc), payments alternatives (i.e. Jack Dorsey’s Square), Personal Finance tools (Geezeo, Mint, GreenSherpa, Blippy, etc), and even in Banking itself (BankSimple, MovenBank).

In September of 2010, Think Finance secured $90 million in start-up funding for their Elastic web-based bank account replacement. Elastic’s services to the underbanked will somewhat overlap with BankSimple’s approach to online banking. But, the CEO of Think Finance, Ken Rees, doesn’t see BankSimple as competition.

“We celebrate all of the innovators in the space that use technology for banking purposes. They [BankSimple] are more focused on the needs of prime consumers. We’re focused on the underbanked and unbanked — the estimated 60 million people who are not well served by traditional banks,” says Rees.
As reported in Mashable

Jack Dorsey at Square is catering for a gap in bank service performance demographics also. Dorsey is aiming Square at the approximately 30 million small business owners in the US that don’t have a merchant account or credit card terminal. With only 6 million businesses in the US that can currently accept credit card payments, this shows there is huge growth potential for thinking outside of the box in respect to banking and payments models.

The growing innovation and infrastructure gap

The problem for the finance sector with the current level of investment in infrastructure, and old stagnant business models built largely around physical distribution paradigms, is that increasingly we’ll be dealing with start-ups and innovators from outside the traditional banking arena. This will increase the gap between customer experience or in real terms, customer behavior, and the actual state of play in the industry.

While the sector as a whole tries to deal with the devastation of the global financial crisis, and uses this as an excuse to hunker down and resist strong investment in technology and so forth, this opens the gate for innovators who are prepared to invest to take customer mind share, and capitalize on both the wholesale dissatisfaction of the industry in general and capturing the imagination of customers through the use of technology and better interface processes.

The 3 Phases of Disruption - Impact to Finance Sector

For those of you who have read BANK 2.0, you may recall the “3 Phases of Behavioral Disruption” which identify the emergence of Internet, the take up of mobile smart phones and “app” phones, and finally the integration of payments technology and services into the handset. There are two broad opportunities within these 3 phases of disruption for adverse impact to the traditional financial services space.

The Infrastructure Gap

The first opportunity lies in the inability of banks and financial institutions to invest in customer facing technology ahead of the curve, which creates a considerable lag in capability. Banks keep looking for ROI, but at the rate that new technologies are being adopted these days, if you wait for ROI you’re already 2-3 years behind the competition. Banks have to make bets on a number of emerging technologies, experiment and adapt through iteration, rather than wait till a dominant player or platform emerges (which is unlikely in any case) before making strong investments.

In this gap we have players like PayPal, cloud services, direct banks (e.g. ING Direct, UBank, Jibun) and other platform opportunities who are doing it better on a technology platform basis than the traditionals. The opportunity here is for start-ups to leap ahead of banks who are straddled with outmoded legacy systems which simply are not robust enough to work in an always on, superconnected space that customers live in today.

The Behavior Gap

The behavior gap, however, is where the really interesting stuff is happening on a business model front. The gap in behavior is defined in anticipating the ways customers work with new technology and reinventing both the user interface, the interactions and the processes and rules that support the engagement or journey. Banks are enamored with their existing, stagnant model of banking – they find it difficult to imagine a world where mobile applications and internet banking are more popular access methods than branches, where checks no longer cut it because I can SMS or bump money to an associate, and where I am not penalized because I don’t want to follow some archaic risk model. Companies like Square, BankSimple, even Apple and Google who are reinventing the interface to the customer are capturing the hearts and minds of customers everyday, while banks continue to frustrate customers with old models, outdated rules of engagement, and with broken processes and channel support mechanisms.

Conclusion

The biggest risk to the finance sector today is not from other banks, nor related to the inability to apply Basel III risk controls or standards. The biggest risk to the finance sector today is the growing gap between the institution and the customer. The rate at which this gap is opening up is increasing rapidly, as the adoption of newer technology increases too. This is where we are going to see an explosion of start-ups and new businesses who aren’t afraid to reinvent the bank customer experience. This is where the banks who do get customer and try to reinvent the journeys customers are taking will win.

It’s also where banks who wait for ROI, or wait to understand the impact of social media, mobile, near-field contactless payments and other such technologies before investing, will lose out massively.

UK Book Signing and Free Drinks! – LONDON 22nd July, 6:30pm

In Book News on July 21, 2010 at 18:00

If you are in the UK on the 22nd of July come along to the official launch of BANK 2.0 in London.

The event will be held at the Blackwell Business and Law Bookshop at the following address:
243-244 High Holborn
London
WC1V 7DZ

The signing event starts at 6:30pm and includes wine, drinks and great company! A number of the elite set of the UK banking and press scene will be there.

Join me if you can! You can reach me at bking@userstrategy.com to RSVP.

CNBC – Strictly Money Segment

In Book News, Customer Experience, Internet Banking, Mobile Banking, Retail Banking, Social Networking, Strategy on July 19, 2010 at 06:04

Watch my BANK 2.0 interview on CNBC Europe’s Strictly Money segment,Monday July 12th at 11:45am.

CNBC Coverage
http://www.cnbc.com/id/15840232?video=1542480651&play=1

Let me know your thoughts about the UK Banking sector and whether you agree/disagree with my views…

BK